Twitter & TV: a few charts

It’s no secret that Twitter and TV are best friends. The company I work for has signed a deal with Bluefin Labs to take advantage of this, and in the UK, my (v. smart) colleague Scott Thompson has begun publishing selected results of our own research.

Anyway — thanks to SMG partners like Sysomos, PeopleBrowsr, and Twitter themselves, my hard drive is bursting with data and charts. Here’s a quick selection, presented with as little commentary as possible.

Twitter responds to TV

When it comes to planning Twitter media campaigns, it seems clear (for the present at least) that brands will have to find predictable trends to form the backbone of their activity. Nothing is more predictable than TV.

The Only Way Is Essex: Seasons 2 & 3 Twitter engagement
The Only Way Is Essex: Seasons 2 & 3 Twitter engagement
The Apprentice: Season 7 Twitter engagement
The Apprentice: Season 7 Twitter engagement

X Factor: Season 8 Twitter engagement
X Factor: Season 8 Twitter engagement

Optimal buying requires real time engagement

X Factor Tweets: 12 November 2011
X Factor Tweets: 12 November 2011

Within each programme there are clear peaks and troughs; some of which may be amplified by clever producers displaying hashtag reminders on screen at dramatic or contentious moments. Ad breaks have an unknown and unpredictable effect (currently) on impression volumes. Twitter’s tools are currently crude; we may need people to manage these campaigns in real time.

Twitter responds to TVCs. Just about.

Champions League Final 2011: Twitter mentions of Heineken
Champions League Final 2011: Twitter mentions of Heineken

Heineken’s sponsorship of the Champions League was particularly successful last year: research from STAP (the Dutch Institute for Alcohol Policy) reveals that the Heineken logo was on screen for almost a third of the match. Still, it seems that viewers had other things to tweet about.

England vs Argentina (RWC 2011): Twitter mentions of O2
England vs Argentina (RWC 2011): Twitter mentions of O2

A particularly fine TVC from O2 generated a bit of noise, but not all that much.

Twitter may be most useful as a data source

This chart, from the wonderfully creative Tony Hirst (@psychemedia) maps out some of the key accounts followed by people who tweeted about Who Wants to be a Millionaire.

Who Wants to be a Millionaire (UK): Twitter "fingerprint"

It turns out that we can compare the “twitter fingerprints” of different programmes — and compare these, in turn, with the twitter fingerprints of our brands.

Please tell me what you think.